My First Blog Post- Culinary Physics Blog

  • By Alberto Ainstain
  • 14 May, 2017

It’s official, I have a blog and I know how to use it.

I have finally decided to take the plunge and add a blog to my site. I always wanted an easy way to share information with visitors and I’m super excited to start this journey. Keep coming back to my site and check for updates right here on the blog.
Please visit my featured blog, just click here now, Culinary Physics Blog .

It was designed to improve the home cook's understanding of expert techniques and flavor combinations in order to produce simple, but mouthwatering home-cook meals.

Culinary Physics Blog

By Alberto Ainstain 20 May, 2017
Discover what thousands of avid readers already know!

These are the most viewed or read recipes and articles on my Culinary Physics blog. Thank you for reading and to be of service to you! For topic suggestions please email me at culinaryphysicist (at) gmail (at) com. I can also lend you or email you some of my cookbooks on Kindle. :-).

For others bloggers, I open for guest posting with a link-back to your website. Don't forget to LIKE my blog's Facebook page ! Thanks! ;-)



10) Artificial Ikura- Artificial Salmon Eggs (Roe) - Molecular Gastronomy Recipes


9) What is Cooking Loss in Meat?


8) Maillard Reaction Mechanism and Its Applications to Your Cooking


7) How to Make Sweet Golden Egg Threads- Fios de Ovos Recipe- (Portuguese) - Foi Thong (Thai)


6) Yogurt Spheres Recipe by Reverse Spherification- Molecular Gastronomy Recipes


5) Tyroshi Honeyfingers Medieval Recipe- Game of Thrones Food Recipes


4) Accurate Sous Vide Cooking Times- PDF Free Download


3) How to Make the Perfect Jamie Oliver's Lancashire Hotpot- Lamb Recipes


2) 9 Best Cookbooks for Sous Vide Cooking Technique


1) How to Keep Cooked Broccoli Bright Green


Please share this to a friend. Even just one friend. Sharing means helping your friends. Sharing make you feel good and even make you LOOK Awesome to others .
By Alberto Ainstain 18 May, 2017
Doro Wat is one such stew, made from chicken and sometimes hard-boiled eggs; the ethnologist Donald Levine records that doro wat is the most popular traditional food in Ethiopia, often eaten as part of a group who share a communal bowl and basket of injera.

This Ethiopian chicken and egg stew is fragrant thanks to the heady mix of berbere spices and a long, slow cooking time. You can buy readymade berbere spice blends in some supermarkets, but I would urge you to make your own if you can. It takes no time at all if you have a spice mill, and the taste will be infinitely fresher. This stew is traditionally eaten with the hands only, using a flatbread to scoop up the tender chicken and eggs.


Serves 4-6

INGREDIENTS:

50g unsalted butter
3 red onions, chopped
8 large chicken thighs, skin on, bone in
4 garlic cloves, crushed
3cm piece fresh root ginger, grated
2 tablespoons tomato purée
juice of 1 lemon
4 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and cut in half
salt and freshly ground black pepper
flatbreads, to serve


For the Berbere Spice Blend

1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
6 cardamom pods
1/2 teaspoon allspice berries
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
2–3 teaspoons chili powder, or to taste
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt


COOKING DIRECTIONS:

1) For the berbere spice blend, toast the coriander seeds in a small frying pan for a minute. When they are fragrant, tip into a spice mill and add the fenugreek, cardamom, allspice and cloves and whizz to a powder. Tip into a small bowl and stir through the paprika, chilli powder, ginger, nutmeg and salt.

2) Take a large, heavy-based pan – ideally wide enough to fit the chicken thighs in a single layer – and set over a low heat. Add the butter and, once melted, add the onions.

3) Cook over a very low heat until the onions are very soft and lightly colored, about 40–45 minutes – the longer the better in terms of flavour. Raise the heat a little and add the chicken thighs, skin down, and fry for 10 minutes or so until pale golden brown. Turn the thighs skin side up and stir through the garlic, ginger, berbere spice blend and tomato purée and pour over 400ml cold water. Add the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer, cover with a lid and cook gently for an hour.

4) Remove the lid and continue to simmer for another 45–60 minutes to thicken the sauce. The chicken should now be really tender and coming away from the bone.

5) Add the egg halves, tucking them between the chicken thighs and pressing them into the sauce, and simmer for another 5 minutes or so until they are warmed through.

6) Divide between bowls and serve with the flatbreads as cutlery!


Related Recipe: If you like chicken, you will definitely like this chicken recipe, get it!, just click here, Why John Legend Usually Need to Eat This Food on Chrissy Teigen's Sexy Butt ?



Reference:

Genevieve Taylor. 2017. MasterChef - Street Food of the World . Absolute Press. ISBN-13: 978-1472909169


Did you know?... 3 Reasons Why Electric Pressure Cooker is Better than Slow Cooker . Learn it here FAST , click now, Complete Electric Pressure Cooker Buying Guide .


VIDEO: Ethiopia - Doro Wat - Slow Cooker Easier Version
By Alberto Ainstain 16 May, 2017
Risotto is a northern Italian rice dish cooked in a broth to a creamy consistency. The broth can be derived from meat, fish, or vegetables. Many types of risotto contain butter, wine, and onion. It is one of the most common ways of cooking rice in Italy.

Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce you to one of the very nicest risottos on planet earth – it is oozy, delicate and super-comforting, with wafer-thin crispy turkey skin, and a well in the middle for your steaming leftover gravy.


Serves 4 or 8 as a starter
35 Minutes

INGREDIENTS:

leftover cooked turkey skin
8 sprigs of fresh thyme
1 onion
1 leek
2 sticks of celery
olive oil
1.4 liters chicken or vegetable stock
300g Arborio risotto rice
125ml Prosecco
300g leftover cooked white turkey meat
100ml leftover turkey gravy
50g Parmesan cheese
25g unsalted butter
1 tablespoon mascarpone cheese
Optional: new season’s extra virgin olive oil


COOKING DIRECTIONS:

1) I like to place any leftover turkey skin from the bottom of the carcass into a cold casserole pan, and then put it on a medium heat so the fat naturally renders out and it becomes super-crisp, like crackling, turning halfway. When it’s golden, strip in the thyme leaves to crisp up for just 10 seconds, then scoop the crispy skin and thyme on to a plate, keeping the pan of flavor some fat to one side.

2) Peel the onion, wash the leek and trim with the celery, then finely chop it all.

3) Return the pan of fat to a medium heat, then add the vegetable and fry for 10 minutes, or until soft but not colored, stirring occasionally, and adding a splash of oil, if needed.

4) Pour the stock into a separate pan and bring to a simmer on a low heat. Stir the rice into the vegetable for a couple of minutes, and then pour in the Prosecco. Let it cook away, then start adding the stock, a ladleful at a time, letting each one cook away before adding more. Keep a close eye on it and stir constantly for 17 minutes, or until the rice is cooked but still retains its shape.

5) Meanwhile, finely chop the turkey meat, stirring it into the pan halfway through the 17 minutes. Reheat your gravy, and then sieve it into a pre-warmed jug ready to pour at the table.

6) When the risotto is done, add enough extra stock to make it oozy, and then remove from the heat. Finely grate over most of the Parmesan and beat it in with the butter and mascarpone, then taste and season to perfection. Put the lid on and take to the table.

7) Divide between your hot plates, make a well in the middle of each portion and flamboyantly pour in the hot gravy, then crack and crumble the crispy skin and thyme over the top.

8) Finish with a tiny extra grating of Parmesan, and a thimble of new season’s extra virgin olive oil, if you have it.


Related Post: Try another Jamie Oliver's favorite recipe, get it here…
How to Make the Jamie Oliver's Savoury Moroccan Vegan M'Hanncha - Vegetarian Recipes


Are you into healthy living or paleo diet? Spare a few minutes and check the best vegetarian cookbooks ( James Beard Award Winners ). Please click here NOW… Best Vegetarian Diet Cookbooks of All Time- 2017 .



Reference:

Jamie Oliver. 2017. Jamie Oliver's Christmas Cookbook . Michael Joseph. ISBN-13: 978-0718183653



Please visit my featured blog, just click here now, Culinary Physics Blog .

It was designed to improve the home cook's understanding of expert techniques and flavor combinations in order to produce simple, but mouthwatering home-cook meals.



Watch Video: November Tech School: Leftover Turkey Risotto
By Alberto Ainstain 14 May, 2017
I have finally decided to take the plunge and add a blog to my site. I always wanted an easy way to share information with visitors and I’m super excited to start this journey. Keep coming back to my site and check for updates right here on the blog.
Please visit my featured blog, just click here now, Culinary Physics Blog .

It was designed to improve the home cook's understanding of expert techniques and flavor combinations in order to produce simple, but mouthwatering home-cook meals.
By Alberto Ainstain 14 May, 2017
10 Reasons You Should Love Blogging


Anyone can make one:

For better or worse, anyone can write a blog post about anything they want. Everyone has a voice and the best voices will rise to the top.

The writer can show their personality:
In blog posts, the writer has more leeway to add in their voice and personality than other types of writing.

Blogs are a great form of mass communication:
You can help people, learn new things, entertain your audience—the possibilities are endless and amazing. Blogging opens up all of these to a very wide audience.

You can make money:

Get the right blog going and you can make a lot of money through advertising and sponsored posts.

It allows people to craft better thoughts:
Instead of reading haphazard, uneducated Facebook statuses, it’s much better to see people’s thought process in a well-written blog post.

You can establish a community:
Blogging allows you to connect with other individuals who share the same interests. Sharing ideas and opinions within your community helps establish yourself as a thought leader.

Good for SEO:
Keeping content on your site fresh and relevant, you can use your blog to boost the search engine ranking (SEO) of your site and your business.

It brings people back to your site:

If your blog is strong enough and updated regularly, people will come back looking for more and bring traffic back to your site as well.

It’s free:
It costs you a grand total of zero dollars to post to the blog, so if you have something to say, there’s nothing to stop you.

You can establish yourself as a thought leader:

A blog is a great place for your original thoughts, and it can be a wonderful way to show off your individuality. If people like your ideas, you can become a thought leader in your industry!

What else do you love about blogs? Let me know!
Please visit my featured blog, just click here now, Culinary Physics Blog .

It was designed to improve the home cook's understanding of expert techniques and flavor combinations in order to produce simple, but mouthwatering home-cook meals.
Share by: